CAPTAIN STEVE'S SEAFOOD GETS 85.50 HEALTH SCORE DURING CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

Charlotte Alerts

Captain Steve's Seafood had expired ranch and blue cheese dressings. Raw meat was stored over cooked okra and crab.

The Captain Steve's Seafood restaurant scored a dismal 85.50 B score on a food health safety inspection on January 28, 2021; the location in question is 8517 Monroe Road Charlotte, NC.

During the inspection there were multiple containers of portioned house made sauces and dressings, including ranch, blue cheese, and more with expired date markings as far back as two weeks ago.

Unpackaged raw beef burgers and raw beef chopped steak were stored directly over containers of uncovered cooked okra and cooked crab.

A Captain Steve's Seafood employee was seen using their bare hands to place onions on a salad for customer consumption. The food health inspector directed the employee to discard the salad and to use tongs to place toppings on salads.

The can opener had multi-day dried food buildup on the blade. The bulk ice machine had extreme organic buildup on the interior surfaces and was in need of cleaning.

There was also no soap at the server area hand sink. Ceiling tiles were missing in various areas in the back of the restaurant. The metal rolling carts and shelving had rust and/or corrosion on them.

The wall surfaces were peeling/damaged in several areas of the restaurant. A whooping 2 points were taken off because Captain Steve's Seafood had no certified food protection manager that was present during the inspection.

The buttermilk, coleslaw, tartar sauce, and multiple bins of cut cabbage all had unsafe temperatures above 41f in the back of the walk in cooler.

There were no date labels on the pulled pork, cooked sweet potatoes, diced deli meat, open buttermilk, sliced cheeses, portion cups of dressings & sauces, slaw, and several other foods.

The inspector observed household Raid & Roach Killer in the back storage area. Household pesticides are not allowed in food service establishments.

Multiple metal pans and plastic food containers were stored stacked together wet, that promotes mold and mildew growth.

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