Well For Culture: Smoothie Recipes in Every Color

Courtesy Chelsey Luger /You can combine an endless variety of healthy ingredients to make smoothies in every color. Healthy eating never has to be boring!

The weather is warm, the fruits are ripe, and summer is pretty much here.

We all love looking and feeling our best in the warmer months. A great way to accomplish this is by eating as many fresh fruits and vegetables as possible. Packing in the nutrients benefits not only your physique, but also the radiance of your skin, the texture of your hair, and most importantly the energy of your mind and body. Smoothies are an easy and delicious way to incorporate these foods into your day.

Unfortunately, smoothies have been subject to plenty of false advertising over the years. Those strawberry-banana concoctions you see at places like McDonald’s or Panera? Not healthy! They are packed with sugar and preservatives. Please pay attention to what’s going in your smoothie. I suggest making your own – this way you can control the flavors and the content. A blender is a great investment!

Here are some adventurous and delicious ingredients to use in your smoothie: beets, kale, mint, lemon, dragon fruit and avocado. Photo courtesy Chelsey Luger.

As a general rule of thumb, here are some things to avoid (and what you can replace them with!).

Instead of white sugar, brown sugar, Stevia, Sweet n Low, or other unnatural and processed sweeteners, use raw honey, coconut sugar, natural maple syrup, or simply rely on the sweetness of the fruit that you choose.

Instead of unnatural, processed peanut butter, use raw, organic nut butters like almond butter, hazelnut butter, sunflower butter, OR of course any of these nuts that you have ground and crushed yourself in raw form.

Instead of oats (which are often added to make a smoothie more filling), use seeds that are nutrient-dense and much healthier for you like chia seeds, flax seeds, or hemp seeds.

Instead of dairy and soy products like milk, soy milk, yogurt, greek yogurt, frozen yogurt, or ice cream, use non-dairy, non-soy alternatives like coconut milk, coconut yogurt, or almond milk … and be sure to get the unsweetened version.

Instead of unnatural, chemical-based protein powders and smoothie mixes like HerbaLife, SlimFast, or other corporate models, use natural ingredients. Some protein powders are okay as they contain mostly natural ingredients, but do your research and make sure that what you’re using is safe.

Instead of canned fruits or vegetables which are often stripped of nutrients and full of GMOs and pesticides, use fresh, organic fruits and vegetables. If using frozen fruit, be sure there is no added sugar or syrup.

Instead of fruit juices from a can or bottle (which tend to be heavily sweetened with processed sugar), use the juices from natural fruit and/or add water, ice, coconut milk, almond milk, or coconut water, for more of a liquid base.

The following are recipes for smoothies in every color. Try them out! For more healthy food recipes and information on Ancestral Diet, go to wellforculture.com/recipes:

DIRECTIONS (for all smoothies): Add all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Adjust amounts of liquids to desired consistency.

This is the “red” smoothie. The beets in this recipe will give you a surge of energy, a great one to drink in the morning if you're feeling sluggish. Photo courtesy Chelsey Luger.

red
1 beet
1/2 apple
handful raspberries +
2 slices lemon (juice only) +
handful strawberries
12 ounces coconut water

yellow
2 slices pineapple
1/2 frozen banana
1 cup coconut milk
1 tsp raw honey

green
1/2 avocado +
handful kale +
1/2 frozen banana
1 cup coconut milk
2 tsp natural, raw honey

purple
1 dragonfruit
half handful blueberries
handful raspberries
6 ounces coconut water

brown
1/2 frozen banana
1 tbsp almond butter
1 scoop chocolate protein powder (shop around for a good one)
1/2 tsp coffee grounds
1 cup coconut milk
mint leaves for garnish

orange
handful frozen mango slices
1/2 orange +
1/4 grapefruit
1/2 banana
1/2 cup coconut water

Chelsey Luger. Photo courtesy Eller Bonifacio.

Chelsey Luger is Anishinaabe and Lakota from North Dakota. She hopes to be a strong link in a long chain of ancestors and descendants by spreading ideas for health and wellness. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter. Ideas for articles? Email her: wellforculture@gmail.com.

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