10 Things to Know Today: South Dakota to meet with tribal leaders

Shawn Bordeaux, state representative in the South Dakota state legislature and a member of the state’s democratic delegation. (File photo)

A look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today

The Associated Press

1. AFTER THE PIPELINE 

South Dakota's State-Tribal Relations body is meeting in Pierre to discuss ways the state can work with tribal governments.

Tuesday's meeting is the first since tension between Gov. Kristi Noem and some tribes over laws passed aimed at potential protests of the Keystone XL pipeline. Noem pushed for the laws, and the Oglala Sioux subsequently banned her from the Pine Ridge Reservation.

Rep. Shawn Bordeaux, a Democrat from Mission, says the meeting is an opportunity to discuss how the state and tribes can move forward.

South Dakota recently settled a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union over the law, agreeing not to enforce some of its aspects.

2. WHO ARE ABOUT TO BECOME HOUSEHOLD NAMES

Diplomats and career government officials, little known outside professional circles, will be testifying in live public hearings in the House impeachment inquiry this week.

3. BOLIVIA'S MORALES GRANTED ASYLUM IN MEXICO

The crisis-torn Andean nation's first indigenous president steps down, and then flees, after violence followed allegations of electoral fraud. Morales has called it a coup by the opposition.

4. US HELD RECORD NUMBER OF MIGRANT KIDS IN CUSTODY IN 2019

Tens of thousands of migrant children have been sent to 170 shelters in 23 states where mental health experts say they risk being exposed to trauma that can cause lifelong problems, AP reports.

5. WHAT'S ON THE LINE FOR IMMIGRANTS

Supreme Court justices are hearing arguments on the Trump administration's bid to end DACA, which shields immigrants brought to the U.S. as children from deportation.

6. CONGRESS HAS UNFINISHED BUSINESS

Lawmakers are pressing for an agreement on $1.4 trillion worth of federal agency budgets or finalizing a rewrite of North American trade rules.

7. CHINA AIMS TO BUILD OWN YELLOWSTONE

Beijing wants to set limits on the Tibetan plateau's growth to implement its own version of one of the U.S.'s proudest legacies — a national park system, AP discovers.

8. 'MAKING HARD CHOICES TO BRING CHANGE'

In the wake of an internal survey that detailed multiple allegations of rape and sexual harassment of its female staffers, the leader of the World Food Program vows to go after abusers, AP learns.

9. NATION'S MIDSECTION BRACES FOR BITTER COLD

Forecasters say the southern Plains to the Great Lakes could experience record cold, thanks to what it calls an "arctic airmass."

10. OKLAHOMA TRIBES PASS ON ARBITRATION

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Oklahoma's 35 tribal nations with casinos have rejected arbitration in a dispute with the state over whether existing gaming compacts automatically renew at the end of the year.

The Tulsa World reports that the tribes say in a letter to state Attorney General Mike Hunter that they remain unified in the belief the compacts renew.

Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt has said the 15-year-old compacts expire at the end of the year and wants to renegotiate them to give the state a larger share of casino revenue.

The tribes pay fees of between 4 percent and 10 percent of a casino's net revenue and receive exclusive rights to operate casinos in the state. The fees generated nearly $139 million for the state last year.

Stitt spokeswoman Baylee Lakey said the governor is disappointed the tribes declined arbitration. Hunter's office declined comment.

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