A close eye on the Virginia election

"Welcome to Virginia sign along northbound Interstate 81 entering Washington County, Virginia, from Bristol Tennessee." (Photo by Famartin | Creative Commons)

Updated: 5:45 p.m. EST

The country looks to the state of Virginia as the outcome of this election, as experts say, give the country a sneak peak into the presidential election amidst the impeachment inquiry.

As many point out, this election (along with Kentucky and Mississippi) is happening in “an off-yer.” Even though it is, it’s still important.

This election is critical because the state legislature, the House and Senate, is up for re-election, which is a total of 140 seats.

Republicans held the majority in both chambers: 20 to 19 in the state Senate and 51 to 48 in the House of Delegates. So with that in mind, Democrats have been pushing to control the state legislature. The state already has a Democrat governor, Ralph Northam, who won in 2017.

With that in mind, CBS News reported if the Democratic party gains control of the House and Senate, “they would control all three branches of government for the first time in 25 years.”

CNN also said that Democrats “poured a record-breaking amount of money” into these races. Vox reported that the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee announced to give $1 million last December and Democrats will be throwing in a total of $2 million by the end of the election cycle and some money is coming from “outside groups.”

Virginia has been in the hotspot with the shooting in Virginia Beach, abortion, minimum wage, and civil rights for the LGTBQ community.

This election also draws eyes to who will be able to draw the congressional districts in 2021 after the 2020 Census.

There are between 22,499 and 80,924 American Indians and Alaska Natives in Virginia, according to the 2010 Census and the 2013-2017 American Community Survey. 

The voting booths close at 7 p.m. Eastern time.

Indian Country Today will update with results.

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