Black Eyed Peas' Taboo, USA Gymnast Ashton Locklear unveil new N7 Collection

Taboo: "It's not just about fashion, Nike N7 is also about the Mission Statement and helping Native communities." Courtesy Nike

Taboo: "It's not just about fashion, Nike N7 is also about the Mission Statement and helping Native communities."

Showing off the latest white hoodie with Native-themed designs, and the Women's full-zip hoodie, Indian Country icons Taboo of the Black Eyed Peas, Shoshone, Hopi, Mexican, and world class USA gymnastics champion Ashton Locklear, Lumbee, are unveiling the latest Nike N7 collection.

Indian Country icons Taboo of the Black Eyed Peas, Shoshone, Hopi, Mexican, and world class USA gymnastics champion Ashton Locklear, Lumbee, are unveiling the latest Nike N7 collection. Courtesy Nike

The Nike N7 collection has been a trailblazer in the world of Native-themed fashion collection and has been guided by the intuitive sights of Nike General Manager Sam McCracken.

According to Taboo, who says the clothing -- which is designed by Native designers -- "It's not just about fashion, Nike N7 is also about the Mission Statement and helping Native communities."

He spoke with Indian Country Today's Vincent Schilling regarding his support of the N7 brand.

Vincent Schilling: You are one of the latest Nike N7 ambassadors, what are your thoughts on giving this support and wearing the gear designed by Tracy Jackson?

Taboo: Well, first of all, it's more about the mission statement that Nike N7 represents, you know, the aesthetics and the apparel and the designs are just an extension of that.

The Nike N7 fund really represents most of all — how it goes back to help tribal communities and helping Native youth stay active and stay healthy. It is an effort that is constantly working in giving opportunities to play basketball, to have gear to play sports, while encouraging Native youth to remain athletic.

It just it always goes back to Native communities and that's what Nike N7 really means to me. It's not just about the gear, it's not about the shoes, It's about the mission statement and it's about what it means to to be able to give back.

Vincent Schilling: Truth be told, you have a massive platform to offer exposure as a member of the Grammy-winning Black Eyed Peas.

Taboo: In life, It’s all about giving back and using the platforms we have. In terms of what I do as an artist, and what what Nike has a brand and Nike N7 is able to facilitate — if we're able to channel that energy and Inspire the youth to continue playing basketball and and and sports and athletics, I'm all about it. And that's awesome for me.

Vincent Schilling: One nice thing about the efforts of N7 in addition to helping provide opportunities for youth is that the designs are fantastic.

Taboo: That is like the icing on the cake in that the design is amazing. I love that. There is a frame of mind, that says, 'okay, that's vanity' and 'I got to design with Tracy Jackson,' and that's dope. But the end goal is 'how much money can we raise to give back to the Nike N7 fund? And 'how many units can we sell to help tribal communities and help the youth stay on that path of healthy living, and giving them facilities and gear to be able to perform their best?'

Vincent Schilling: Great perspective Taboo, any other thoughts?

Taboo: Sometimes when people see corporate entities selling clothing, their mind jumps to sweatshops. I just think that is outlandish bull. People have also criticized the Native themes, but the gear is designed by Native artists, including the themes. I really want to hit home with this: The Nike N7 fund, mission statement is more than just a collection.

Taboo and Ashton Locklear sporting the latest N7 gear:

Ashton Locklear
Taboo and Ashton Locklear

For more information visit: The N7 Collection

Follow Indian Country Today’s associate editor Vincent Schilling (Akwesasne Mohawk) on Twitter - @VinceSchilling

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Comments
No. 1-3
David Hollenshead
David Hollenshead

When I first heard about the N7 Collection, I thought "great, now I can buy shoes that fit". Unfortunately, I learned that they were selling them in the same sizes as​ the rest of their shoes. Why is it that the only shoes that fit me are work boots ??? Why is it that the only suit that fit me was from a used clothing shop, had been made by a tailor, and came with a funeral service program, for a Christian member of the Potawatomi​ ??? Seriously, if Nike really cared, then their shoes would fit more than just Europeans...

JackBilly71TL
JackBilly71TL

Cha-Ching......$$$$$! A timed "reinvention" for cash endeavor. "Taboo" rode that gravy train called "Blacked Eyed Peas" up to about 8 years ago - now 8 years an album WITHOUT Fergie is out. This guy spoke up or about his "nativeness" but only to market his Los Angeles heritage. But, because he fits the narrative of not being white........it's apparently OKAY to be the "Fake Indian" that so many DEM regressives have take against. Everybody now will see how far he can carry this new gravy train......$$$$.

todineeshzhee
todineeshzhee

In what world can Taboo be plausibly be Hopi? He has no Hopi members in his family. He belongs to no clan. I think he is another Elizabeth Warren. At other times he has said his mother was "Dakota Sioux descent". Other times he says he is part Shoshoni. But none of his family is from anywhere near there. His family is Mexican American. His mother's family was from Sonora and Zacatecas and Chihuahua. His father's family is also Mexican. I am sure he in a great deal Indigenous Native Mexican. But he is NOT Hopi, Shoshoni, or Lakota. He has a story where he claims his grandmother "was part Shoshone, and encouraged me to embrace the “warrior spirit” that was, she said, forever in my blood. Under Shoshone law, a defeated warrior has to leave his tribe forever. Legend demanded it". This is just like the typical "Cherokee Princess" stories. There were no "Shoshoni warriors" who went to Mexico and mysteriously married into their family. These are "fake indian" stories. Just like Nasdijj or Terry Tafoya Someone at Indian Country should really fact check this guy.