Indian Country Today video news report for March 27, 2019, with Vincent Schilling

Supreme Court upholds treaty rights of Yakama, Navajo Nation's transition beyond coal and a Trump Presidential Task Force for Native children and the IHS

Watch this week's video here

Video Transcript

Greetings and She:kon everyone, this is Vincent Schilling and I am the associate editor of Indian Country Today and your host for this week’s Video News Update. With this video update, Indian Country Today will bring you some of our top stories to hit the site.

The Supreme Court upholds treaty rights of Yakama Nation 

Read the article: Supreme Court upholds treaty rights of Yakama Nation in Cougar Den fuel supplier taxation case

According to a landmark ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court on March 19, a Yakama Nation-licensed fuel retailer can continue importing fuel for resale on the Yakama Reservation without paying an import tax to the State of Washington. The 5-4 decision was a narrow victory for the Yakama as the Washington State Department of Licensing sought several million dollars in fees and penalties from Cougar Den, Inc. for the fuel it imports from Biggs, Oregon. Yakama Nation Chairman JoDe Goudy said the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision reinforces the Yakama way of life, both in historical context as well as modern interpretation.

The Navajo Nation’s interest in taking over a coal mine and a generating station has come to an end. 

Read the story: The Navajo Nation's transition beyond coal 'starts now'

That will mean a dramatic change in energy policy, jobs, as well as the loss of millions of dollars in lease payments to the Navajo Nation and the Hopi Tribe. The Salt River Project announced in 2017 that it would close the 2,250-megawatt Navajo Generating Station by the end of this year. This decision will have a considerable impact on families working in the industry, while environmental groups assert coal is not the future. Contracts for cleanup will be for the next several years.

The National Native American Hall of Fame is opening up the 2019 Hall of Fame nomination process. 

Read the story: 2019 National Native American Hall of Fame nomination process begins March 22

Votes will determine the 12 Native Americans who will be inducted from a list of 30 nominees. The public is being asked to vote on the nominees, which will assist in the process of determining the 12 individuals who will be recognized at the 2019 National Native American Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Tulsa, Oklahoma on November 2. This will be the organization’s second year celebrating the event. Vote by following the story link below.

The Tulalip Tribes have announced the sponsorship of two medicinal Cannabis research projects at the Stanford University School of Medicine. 

Read the story: Tulalip Tribes announce sponsorship of cannabis medical research

The project is a thirty-month, $2 million dollar research award committed to developing Cannabis-derived medicines with the potential to treat opioid addiction and Alzheimer’s disease. More details below.

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump announced the formation of a Presidential Task Force on Protecting Native American Children in the Indian Health Service System. 

Read the story: Trump Administration forms Presidential Task Force for protecting Native Children in IHS

According to a senior administration official, President Trump has “charged the Task Force with investigating the institutional and systemic breakdown that failed to prevent a predatory pediatrician from sexually assaulting children while acting in his capacity as a doctor in the Indian Health Service.” The pediatrician, Dr. Stanley Patrick Weber was an IHS doctor sentenced to prison for sexual assault of Native boys. Weber left the IHS in 2016, and he is now serving time. Top appointees by President Trump to lead the task force are Joseph Grogan, Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy, and United States Attorney Trent Shores, who will both serve as Co-Chair. “I appreciate the confidence placed in me by President Trump to help lead this Task Force,” said U.S. Attorney Trent Shores, who is Choctaw.

THANKS FOR WATCHING Leave a comment below on our site. You can register with a few quick clicks. You can comment on stories, reply to other readers and add to the conversation.

Also, check out my #NativeNerd column posted every Friday. Last week’s column was on a great cell phone network by Google, called Google Fi, check it out.

Again, Thanks for watching this week’s ICT video news report. I am Vincent Schilling, associate editor of Indian Country Today. Follow me on Twitter at @VinceSchilling.

Have a great day! Ona and Nia:wen.

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Follow Indian Country Today’s associate editor Vincent Schilling (Akwesasne Mohawk) on Twitter - @VinceSchilling

Email - vschilling@indiancountrytoday.com

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