PBS Frontline, Wall Street Journal broadcast 'Predator on the Reservation'

Program uncovers Dr. Stanley Patrick Weber an IHS doctor sentenced to prison for sexual assault of Native boys

The television program, Predator on the Reservation, airedTuesday, February 12, at 10/9c, on PBS, FRONTLINE.

You can watch it online now.

In mid-January of 2019, Dr. Stanley Patrick Weber, an Indian Health Service doctor, was sentenced to more than 18 years in prison due to several accounts of sexually abusing Native boys on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation next to Browning, Montana.

The program is an end result of reporting by PBS in collaboration with the Wall Street Journal who investigated what the producers cite as a “decades-long failure to stop Weber, a government pediatrician, who moved from reservation to reservation despite warnings about his behavior.”

In Predator on the Reservation, FRONTLINE and The Wall Street Journal investigate a pediatrician accused of sexually abusing Native American boys for years, looking into the decades-long failure to stop the government doctor who moved from reservation to reservation despite warnings. This photograph was taken on the Blackfeet reservation in Browning, Montana.

According to the program’s episode site page, the investigations began two years ago when two reporters from the Wall Street Journal, Christopher Weaver and Dan Frosch were reporting on the Indian Health Service. During their investigations, they uncovered the story of Dr. Stanley Patrick Weber, a sexual predator, as well as other problematic physicians within the IHS health system.

According to Journal reporter Weaver, “We found a bunch of doctors who had troubled track records either before they were hired by the IHS or after they got there.”

After a series of interviews with families, healthcare administrators, tribal police and victims, the program will report on how Weber continued to treat patients on the Blackfeet Reservation as well as at Pine Ridge after a transfer.

The episode’s site page also listed remarks from the show’s producer as well as the Journal’s editor in chief.

“This is a deeply troubling story, but also an important piece of accountability journalism—on a subject that virtually no one else has examined,” says FRONTLINE Executive Producer Raney Aronson-Rath on the site page. “We are pleased to be collaborating with the editors and reporters at the The Wall Street Journal who spent years investigating this story.”

“This report is the result of exhaustive and enterprising work among our investigative, U.S. news and video teams, who worked closely with FRONTLINE to bring this important investigation into the light,” says Journal Editor in Chief Matt Murray. “We’re incredibly proud of their work.”

In Predator on the Reservation, FRONTLINE and The Wall Street Journal investigate a pediatrician accused of sexually abusing Native American boys for years, looking into the decades-long failure to stop the government doctor who moved from reservation to reservation despite warnings. This photograph is of the accused pediatrician, Dr. Stanley Weber.

The site also lists comments from several doctors who said they long had had concerns about Weber.

Thus far, federal prosecutors have also charged Weber with the abuse of four Native boys on Pine Ridge. And two at the Blackfeet reservation.

About the program and the organizations involved

FRONTLINE and The Wall Street Journal Collaboration

Journalistic collaborations are one of the ways FRONTLINE seeks to maximize the impact of its investigative reporting. This new partnership between FRONTLINE and The Wall Street Journal includes the PBS broadcast of Predator on the Reservation, along with an accompanying print article in the Journal and streams of the investigation on both websites, on pbs.org/frontline and WSJ.com

Credits

Predator on the Reservation is a FRONTLINE Production with Left/Right Docs in partnership with The Wall Street Journal and WSJ Films. The producers, reporters and writers are Dan Frosch, Gabe Johnson and Christopher Weaver. The correspondents are Dan Frosch and Christopher Weaver. The senior producer is Frank Koughan. The executive producer of FRONTLINE is Raney Aronson-Rath.

About FRONTLINE

FRONTLINE, U.S. television’s longest running investigative documentary series, explores the issues of our times through powerful storytelling. FRONTLINE has won every major journalism and broadcasting award, including 91 Emmy Awards and 20 Peabody Awards. Visit pbs.org/frontline and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Tumblr and Google+ to learn more. FRONTLINE is produced by WGBH Boston and is broadcast nationwide on PBS. Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, the John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, Heising-Simons Foundation, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

About The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a global news organization that provides leading news, information, commentary and analysis. Published by Dow Jones, The Wall Street Journal engages readers across print, digital, mobile, social, and video. Building on its heritage as the preeminent source of global business and financial news, the Journal includes coverage of U.S. & world news, politics, arts, culture, lifestyle, sports, and health. It holds 37 Pulitzer Prizes for outstanding journalism. Follow them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

Follow Indian Country Today’s associate editor Vincent Schilling (Akwesasne Mohawk) on Twitter - @VinceSchilling

Email - vschilling@indiancountrytoday.com

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