Photo essay: Native craft, home, and culture from Fond du Lac to Frank's Landing

Skylar Sampson won third place for her painting produced at the Indigenous Environmental Network's annual Protecting Mother Earth conference.

Photos from the Fond du Lac Reservation Kiwenz Culture Camp and the Protecting Mother Earth Conference in Washington

Mary Annette Pember has been taking photos across Indian Country: From the Protecting Mother Earth, and Indigenous Environmental Network Conferences on the Fond du Lac Reservation in Minnesota, to Frank's Landing, Washington, here are powerful images to enjoy.

Photos from the Fond du Lac Reservation / Kiwenz Ojibwe Language and Culture Camp

Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota. Participants in the Kiwenz Ojibwe language and culture immersion camp, learned about traditional names, use and responsible harvesting of plant medicines.

Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota. Participants in the Kiwenz Ojibwe language and culture immersion camp, learned about traditional plant medicines such as Shkitaagan or Chaga, a mushroom that grows on birch trees, that has been used by Ojibwe to boost the immune system and as an anticancer treatment.

Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota. Mitchel Sheridan, 6 months watches his grandmother Hazel Hindsley of the St. Croix Ojibwe Nation make mats out of bulrushes during the Kiwenz camp. Mom, Cheyenne Sheridan said, "He is fascinated by weaving."

Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota. The Kiwenz campground is named after Mike Shabaiash, a well known advocate for the preservation of Ojibwe language and culture. Literally translated as "old man', Kiwenz is a title of great respect in the Ojibwe language. Kiwenz camp was created to help the community learn and share the Ojibwe language, culture and crafts. The camp is named after Mike Shabaiash also known as Kiwenz. He was a great protector of Ojibwe language and ways. According to coordinator Janis Fairbanks, over 1,000 people participated in this years free 3-day event. The camp is funded by the State of Minnesota Indian Affairs Council Ojibwe Language Revitalization Grant and the Fond du Lac Reservation language program funds.

Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota. Kids at the Kiwenz camp take a break on the swings.

Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota. Brilliant Ojibwe finger woven sashes hang outside a demonstrators tent at the Kiwenz Camp. Dennis White demonstrated and taught campers how to weave traditional sashes.

Fond du Lac, Minnesota. Kiwenz Camp attendees got a chance to carve their own pipes out of pipestone.

Fond du Lac Réservation, Minnesota. Participants in the Kiwenz Ojibwe language and culture immersion camp, learned about traditional names, use and responsible harvesting of plant medicines.

Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota. Patricia Gardner demonstrates traditional Ojibwe floral beadwork on velveteen during the 10th annual Kiwenz camp. During the 3-day language immersion camp, participants learned how to do beadwork, make pipes, weave sashes and mats while learning the Ojibwe language.

Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota. Ojibwe elder Mary Moose struggles to inflate a balloon to be used in a chemistry experiment during the 10th annual Kiwenz Ojibwe language and culture camp.

Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota. Dr. Arne Vainio, official "Mad Scientist" at the 10th annual Kiwenz Ojibwe language and culture camp demonstrates the concept of sublimation using dry ice and balloons. During sublimation, solids transform into gas. Vainio, Ivy Vainio, Jeff Savage and others in the community organized the camp 10 years ago during a conversation while seated around a backyard picnic table. Kiwenz camp was created to help the community learn and share the Ojibwe language, culture and crafts.

Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota. Dr. Arne Vainio of the Ojibwe Nation plays "Mad Scientist" during the 10th annual Kiwenz camp. As he demonstrates the concept of sublimation (in which a solid transforms into gas) using dry ice and balloons, he describes the experiment in English, George Roy interprets in Ojibwe. John Daniel looks on.

Photos from Indigenous Environmental Network's Protecting Mother Earth Conference / Frank's Landing, Washington

Frank's Landing, Washington. Dianna Uqualla of the Havasupai Nation speaks to youth about her community's opposition to uranium mining on their reservation in Supai, Arizona. Located at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, the Havasupai are concerned about President Donald Trump's desire to open the area up to mining. In 2012, the Obama administration established a 20-year ban on uranium mining in the Grand Canyon region.

Frank's Landing, Washington. Lana Jack dances to her car wearing the water protectors motto, "Water is Life," during the Indigenous Environmental Network's 17th annual Protecting Mother Earth conference.

Frank's Landing, Washington. Marie Gladue of the Dine' Nation tries on a traditional Haida cedar hat during the Indigenous Environmental Network's 17th annual Protecting Mother Earth Conference.

Franks Landing, Washington. Local Olympia area Hawaiian youth perform traditional dances at the annual Indigenous Environmental Network conference. The youth belong to ManaiaOhana, a Hawaiian culture and dance group co-founded by Ho'oma'lammala Brown of Olympia, Washington.

Franks Landing, Washington. Local Olympia area Hawaiian youth perform traditional dances at the annual Indigenous Environmental Network conference.

Frank's Landing, Washington. Youth take a break with a game of musical chairs after presenting Hawaiian dances during the Indigenous Environmental Network's 17th annual Protecting Mother Earth Conference. Manaia Ohana was created by local Olympia area Hawaiian families who want to teach their children language and culture. Co-founder, Ho'oma'lammala Brown said that performing gives children access to their Hawaiian ways even far from Hawaii.

Frank's Landing, Washington. Skylar Sampson won third place for her painting produced at the Indigenous Environmental Network's annual Protecting Mother Earth conference.

Frank's Landing, Washington. Summer camp with a message. Teresa Johnson has been running the daycare program for annual Indigenous Environmental Network's Protecting Mother Earth Conference for years. The Lakota mother and grandmother lost her 16 -year -old daughter, Amy to pollution related heart problems. Volunteering her time and gathering donated craft materials for kids at conferences helps her keep the memory of her daughter alive while passing along the message to children to care for the earth.

Frank's Landing, Washington. In addition to language and culture, summer camps in Indian Country offer the chance for organizing and educating folks about environmental issues facing Native communities. Ninawa Inu'Hunikui of the Alliance of Mother Nature's Guardians, applies red ochre during the Indigenous Environmental Network's 17th annual Protecting Mother Earth Conference at Frank's Landing in Washington last month.

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