10 things to know: New Mexico task force on missing & murdered Indigenous women

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The Associated Press

1.  NEW MEXICO TASK FORCE ON MISSING & MURDERED INDIGENOUS WOMEN

Members of a New Mexico taskforce established to address the deaths and disappearances of Native American women say they want to hear from victims and their family members in the coming year.

New Mexico officials convened the taskforce's first meeting Friday afternoon in Albuquerque. The committee includes representatives of New Mexico tribes, state officials and victim advocates.

More than 60 members of the public also attended the meeting.

A bill signed by the governor this year calls for the committee to determine the scope of the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women in New Mexico. Members also are expected to identify factors that might be hindering law enforcement investigations.

The taskforce has until November 2020 to report findings.

More than a half-dozen states have established similar committees or reports.

2. PROTESTER SHOT BY POLICE IN HONG KONG IN DAY OF SPIRALING VIOLENCE

The shooting of an anti-government protester in the stomach by an officer was captured on video as demonstrators blocked train lines and roads and a man was set on fire following an apparent dispute over national identity.

3. IMPEACHMENT: WHAT'S NEXT

Americans will have their public first view of the impeachment inquiry, as proceedings emerge from closed doors to live hearings.

4. WHAT PROMPTED BOLIVIA'S PRESIDENT TO RESIGN

President Evo Morales left office after his reelection victory triggered weeks of fraud allegations and deadly protests.

5. PALESTINIAN RECOUNTS HORROR OF BEING ABUSED, SHOT BY ISRAELIS

Karam Qawasmi tells the Associated Press that he was run over by a military jeep, then beaten for hours before troops released him, only to shoot him in the back as he walked away.

6. 'GIVING THE LITTLE GUY A CHANCE, THAT'S WHAT IT'S ABOUT'

Roughly a half-dozen candidates in the very bottom tier of the Democratic presidential primary are soldiering on, hoping that there's still a chance to catch fire.

7. THE NATION'S OLDEST-EVER EX-PRESIDENT DRAWS HUNDREDS TO SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS

Ninety-five year old Jimmy Carter still teaches roughly twice a month at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown of Plains in Georgia.

8. KAISER PERMANENTE CEO DIES

Bernard J. Tyson, the first African American to head the company, died in his sleep at the age of 60

9. CHINESE E-COMMERCE GIANTS REPORT $50 BILLION IN SINGLES DAY SALES SO FAR

The annual marketing event is the world's busiest online shopping day with retailers offering discounts on goods from craft beer to TV sets to health care packages.

10. NEW SOCIAL STUDIES IN NEBRASKA

The Nebraska State Board of Education has approved new social studies standards aimed at encouraging students to look at history from multiple perspectives, including those of religious, racial and ethnic groups, women, LGBTQ people and Native American nations.

The standards adopted Friday were written by a group of Nebraska educators and suggest what students should learn about history, government, civics, geography and economics.

The standards adopted in 2012 encouraged examining history from different perspectives. The new proposal emphasizes the importance of understanding different points of view and provides examples as emphasis.

The Nebraska Education Department's Cory Epler says the increased emphasis reflects the department's commitment to equity.

He says students should be able to see themselves in the standards, and the standards also should "create a window for students to see other students."

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