Anchorage Superior Court judge upholds right of fishermen and residents to protect Bristol Bay

Pictured: President Barack Obama with salmon fisherwomen, Kanakanak Beach in Bristol Bay, Alaska, September 2, 2015. "He was just excited to see you," one of the salmon fisherwoman exclaimed after a salmon spawned on the President's feet.(The White House, Public Domain)

United Tribes of Bristol Bay among defendants opposing Pebble’s toxic mine plan

News Release

United Tribes of Bristol Bay

On May 17, the Anchorage Superior Court dismissed the Pebble-funded lawsuit trying to silence fishermen and Bristol Bay residents opposing Pebble’s toxic mine plan. The Judge found the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association had the right to not only promote Bristol Bay wild salmon on the world markets, but to take steps necessary to protect that the integrity of that brand. In addition to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association, the United Tribes of Bristol Bay and the non-profit Salmon State were all named as defendants.

n response to the Court’s order, United Tribes of Bristol Bay Executive Director Alannah Hurley made the following statement:

“Today’s decision allows Bristol Bay residents and fishermen to continue focusing on the business at hand: preparing for the return of 40 million salmon this summer and fighting to protect this run for future generations. We are very pleased that the Court saw the direct connection between protecting our salmon fishery and protecting the land and waters that make that fishery possible. The Court’s order today confirms that the people and fishermen of Bristol Bay have the right to fight for our way of life.”

United Tribes of Bristol Bay logo
(United Tribes of Bristol Bay)

About United Tribes of Bristol Bay

The United Tribes of Bristol Bay is a tribal consortium representing 15 Bristol Bay tribal governments (that represent over 80 percent of the region’s total population) working to protect the Yup’ik, Dena’ina, and Alutiiq way of life in Bristol Bay.

Comments