New locally-focused eatery Sixty-Six Acres is open for business in Albuquerque

New Alburquerque restaurant Sixty-Six acres serves up locally-focused craft beers and dishes including New Mexico shrimp and grits.Photo courtesy: Joel Wigelsworth, IPCC Marketing

Myra Ghattas pays tribute to original allotment of land provided for Indian boarding schools on which her eatery sits

News Release

Indian Pueblos Marketing, Inc.

Indian Pueblos Marketing, Inc. is pleased to announce its newest tenant is open for business in the next phase of development of Avanyu Plaza on 12th Street, across from the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center.

Local restaurateur Myra Ghattas, known for the immensely popular and award-winning Slate Street Cafe, has opened her new restaurant, Sixty-Six Acres. The name pays tribute to the original allotment of land provided for the Indian boarding schools, on which Avanyu Plaza sits.

Image courtesy: twitter.com/sixtysixacres

“We are very enthusiastic about being across the street from the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, one of the most-visited sites in New Mexico,” Ghattas says about choosing the location of her new restaurant. “We like the positive development of the area, and have been watching some really positive changes happen. We also received feedback that the nearby neighborhoods were hoping for a local, independent restaurant to open in the area.”

Sixty-Six Acres: Kitchen | Cocktails | Craft Beer is a modern bar and grill with appetizers, sharables, salads, sandwiches, flatbreads, and bowls. The restaurant has a local and community focus, sourcing as much as possible from local growers and businesses. Fourteen local breweries and eight local distillers are represented, and a retail area features local brews and spirits, along with apparel, gifts, and artisan crafts all showing local pride.

The community theme continues with plenty of large tables for groups, a community highboy table perfect for happy hour, and carries over outdoors on a huge patio with a fireplace for colder days, and plenty of shade for warmer days.

Ghattas says business has been really good, especially in light of the restaurant’s low-key soft opening on December 15. “The soft opening allowed us to make sure our menu and systems were working, and we used that time to make some tweaks and adjustments, and it was invaluable,” Ghattas says.

Traffic during this period has been driven exclusively by word-of-mouth enthusiasm. “People are constantly asking me about it, and telling me about their experience,” Ghattas says. “The feedback has been overwhelmingly great, lots of positive comments.”

The restaurant’s striking interior design that is both modern and rustic was a collaboration between owner Ghattas, architect Joe Slagle, and contractor Hart Construction. Sixty-Six Acres is currently open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and noon to 8 p.m. on Sunday. Monday hours are likely to arrive in February. Reservations are not accepted at this time.

For more information, contact Sixty-Six Acres at (505) 243-2153, via their Facebook page, or in-person at 2400 12th Street NW, Building B North, Albuquerque, NM 87104.

About Indian Pueblos Marketing, Inc.

Indian Pueblos Marketing, Inc. (IPMI) was founded by the 19 pueblos of New Mexico to provide economic opportunities for Pueblo and Native American artists, as well as employment and career development opportunities for Pueblo people. IPMI is a for-profit umbrella that includes a premier Native American arts store and website, an award-winning Native American restaurant, the largest Starbucks in New Mexico, the top-rated Holiday Inn Express in Albuquerque, and other properties that support our Pueblo culture and communities.

About the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center

Founded in 1976 by the 19 Pueblo Indian Tribes of New Mexico, the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center is a world-class museum and cultural center located in the historic Albuquerque Indian School District. The IPCC’s mission is to preserve and perpetuate Pueblo culture and to advance understand by presenting with dignity and respect the accomplishments and evolving history of the Pueblo people of New Mexico. To learn more, please visit: www.facebook.com/IndianPueblo and www.indianpueblo.org

About the Albuquerque Indian School District

The AISD Community is a self-sustaining, globally recognized cultural and business corridor that was established to create economic development opportunities for the 19 pueblos of New Mexico.

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