Over a dozen tribes selected for funding from Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund for new clean energy projects

Tribal member installs solar system for family on the Picuris Pueblo.(Photo: Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund)

Applications totaled more than $7 million in requests for tribal solar projects

News Release

Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund

More than a dozen tribes and tribal organizations have been awarded funding for new solar projects from the Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund (TSAF), a tribal-led initiative with seed funding from Wells Fargo that aims to catalyze the growth of solar energy and expand solar job opportunities in tribal communities across the United States.

Funding for new tribal facility and residential solar energy projects, including matching funds for Department of Energy grants, will help further tribal energy security and resilience, workforce training, and build tribal energy sovereignty. Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund received more than 40 applications totaling over $7 million in requests for tribal solar projects from dozens of applicants, demonstrating the need and excitement for renewable energy technology and workforce development in tribal communities. 

“The spirit of self-determination, resilience, and environmental and cultural stewardship is inescapable throughout tribal communities,” said Adam Bad Wound (Lakota), GRID Alternatives vice president of philanthropy and founder of the Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund. “Our vision for Indian Country is a transition to energy sovereignty that is educational, entrepreneurial, and completely renewable.” 

“These projects will help improve quality of life and housing affordability in tribal communities while providing workforce development opportunities for tribe members in the rapidly growing clean-energy sector,” said Ramsay Huntley, Vice President, and Clean Technology and Innovation Philanthropy Program Officer at Wells Fargo. “Wells Fargo is pleased to support the Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund – a signature component of our larger effort to address unique economic, social and environmental needs in Indian Country.” 

Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund 2019-2020 grantees - graphic
(Photo: Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund)

Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund 2019-2020 grantees:

  • Big Pine Paiute Tribe - Big Pine Paiute Water Pump Solar Project
  • Chemehuevi Indian Tribe - Chemehuevi Single-Family Solar Project 2019
  • Kashia Band of Pomo Indians - Solar Electric Systems for 4 Low-Income Members of the Kashia Band of Pomo Indians
  • Northern Circle Indian Housing Authority - Solar Electric Systems for 10 Low-Income Members of the Northern Circle Indian Tribes
  • Ojo Encino Chapter - Ojo Encino Solar Project
  • Picuris Pueblo - Pueblo of Picuris Community Solar System Phase II
  • Pinoleville Pomo Nation - Pinoleville Pomo Nation Youth Education Facility-Roof Top Solar Demonstration Project
  • Rosebud Sioux Tribe - Rosebud Sioux Tribe Sicangu Village Solar Partnership Initiative
  • Round Valley Indian Housing Authority (RVIHA) - Solar Electric Systems for 10 Low-Income Members of the Round Valley Indian tribes
  • San Pasqual Band of Mission Indians - San Pasqual Band Solar and Microgrid
  • Timbisha Shoshone - Dependable Home Power
  • United Tribes Technical College - United Tribes Technical College's Solar for Everyone Initiative
  • Wiyot Tribe - Solar Electric Systems for 4 Low-Income Members of the Wiyot Tribe
  • Yurok Tribe - Yurok Solar Project-Tulley Creek Facilities

About the Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund

GRID Alternatives’ Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund was launched in 2018 with a 3-year, $5 million grant from the Wells Fargo Foundation. Since 2010, GRID has partnered with tribes in a community-centric approach to increase renewable energy capacity, resilience, and energy sovereignty. The fund builds on this work to provide grants that catalyze the growth of solar energy and expand solar job opportunities in tribal communities across the United States. To further expand access to renewable energy in tribal communities, TSAF welcomes new donors and partnerships to contribute to the fund. For more information, visit www.tribalsolar.org.

Comments (1)
No. 1-1
robert55
robert55

these tribes disgrace their Ancestors over money