LAPD Cop's Arrest on Rape Charges leads to 2nd Rape Arrest from years earlier

DNA evidence led to the arrest of an LAPD cop on allegations that he sexually assaulted two women

Los Angeles police officer William Rodriguez, 33, a 10-year veteran of the department, was apprehended by detectives with the LAPD Robbery-Homicide Division on July 16. Rodriguez is charged with two counts of forcible rape.

Detectives began to investigate Rodriguez after receiving a report that he had raped an acquaintance in his home on Nov. 1 of last year ABC 7 News reports.

During the investigation, they got a DNA “cold hit” on Rodriguez using the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), which linked him to a second sexual assault which had occurred in August of 2015. That case had been unsolved, but when Rodriguez’s DNA was entered into the CODIS database, it produced the cold hit, prosecutors say.

Both sexual assaults occurred while he was off-duty, police disclosed. Rodriguez has since been placed on administrative leave from the department.

LAPD Chief Michel Moore said the following in a statement:

“When one of our own breaks the trust of the people we are sworn to protect and to serve, it tarnishes the badge we all wear proudly on our chests. This arrest also reflects our commitment to pursue every lead no matter where the investigation takes us.”

Rodriguez is being held on $1.2 million bail and is due back in court on July 30. If convicted as charged, he faces a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison.

Comments (2)
No. 1-2
Abhaya7
Abhaya7

Southern California is the land of rapist loving cops and rapist cops. Kamala Harris promoted corruption all throughout California when she was AG.

supervisionrequired
supervisionrequired

we need a new hiring process. when a cop gets hired they get ran through the NCIC with fingerprints, dna, mug shot, and any complaints added after they have been hired. already hired, get in line and get it done or find a new lob!!!! anyone that goes to jail gets run, so why shouldn't cop get run too!!!!!!

i think if we did this we would most likely solve about 62% of cold cases....