Did Dallas Police Officer Amber Guyger Kill Botham Jean over a Noise Complaint?

A noise complaint was made about Jean's apartment from Guyger's apartment the same day of the shooting, lawyers say.

With each passing day since Dallas police officer Amber Guyger shot and killed Botham Jean in his own apartment comes a new version of the events leading up to the shooting with each version placing more and more blame on the victim instead of the shooter.

First, it was reported through anonymous police sources that Guyger tried to enter Jean's apartment with her key, thinking it was her apartment, but the key would not open the door, which was when she placed several items down she was holding to continue struggling with the door.

But Jean, according to the source, apparently heard her struggling with the door, which was when he opened it from the inside, making her fear for her life, which was when she shot him.

​However, the apartment doors at the Southside Flats apartment complex are equipped with electronic keys, similar to hotel rooms, where a green light turns on when the right key is inserted and a red light turns on when the wrong key is inserted as you can see in this video.

So if the above narrative is true, then she should have known within a second that she was at the wrong door.

And if she did place the items she was holding down, then she would have placed them on the red doormat in front of his door, which would have been another indicator that she was at the wrong door because she did not have a doormat in front of her unit.

Then another version of the story came from another anonymous police source claiming that Jean had left the door unlocked, which was how she was able to get in, even if her key did not work. That source told local media that she did not see the red doormat because of the items she was carrying, so apparently she did not place the items down in this version.

She then stepped into the darkened apartment and saw Jean, shooting him because she thought he was a burglar, apparently dropping the items she was holding and pulling out her gun without bothering to turn on the lights, even though the light switches are on the inside wall next to the door.

However, the apartment doors at the Southside Flats apartment complex lock automatically unless the resident purposely unlocks it from the inside. The doors, like most modern doors in modern residential buildings, can be opened from the inside without unlocking the top lock, so they remain locked by default

And a third version of the narrative came on the affidavit released Monday, stating that Jean had left the door to his apartment ajar, which was why she was able to step into the darkened apartment where she spotted a silhouette of a man in the darkness.

The affidavit states she gave him "verbal commands" as if he had just broken into her apartment but he did not comply, so he had to die.

However, the doors to those apartments are designed to close automatically, making it almost impossible to leave ajar unless some type of door stopper is used as demonstrated by one of the building's residents in this video.

And if the apartment was so dark that she could not determine she was in the wrong apartment, then how was she able to clearly see he was not showing her his hands as claimed in the second version of events?

And now the attorney for Jean's family is saying that there had been multiple noise complaints from Guyger's apartment regarding Jean's apartment, which was on the fourth floor directly above her third-floor apartment.

Attorney Lee Merritt says there was even a noise complaint that very day from Guyger's apartment about Jean's apartment, but did not provide more details as to exactly who made the complaint and to whom the complaint was made as you can see in the above video where he also confirms the doors to those apartments shut automatically, making it dubious that the door was left ajar.

However, police are saying that Guyger has just completed a long shift, ranging from 12 to 15 hours, depending on which version you believe, so if that's the case, she should not have been at home. And there is no evidence at the moment that anybody else lived in the apartment with her. And there is no evidence they dated or socialized with each other as some have speculated after a rumor started going around on Facebook.

Merritt also said that he spoke to two witnesses who were inside their own apartment when they heard knocking down the hallway, followed by a woman's voice saying, "Let me in. Let me in."

Then the witnesses heard gunshots followed by a man's voice saying, "Oh my God, why did you do that?"

But police did not interview those witnesses, making no mention of them in their affidavit, which reads like it was written by Guyger herself.

However, police say they will now interview the witnesses since Merritt made his statements to the national media, according to Fox 4.

The two witnesses are sisters. They told their contradictory story to the civil attorneys representing Jean's family. They will now tell their stories to investigators trying to gather all the information they can to present a full picture of what happened to a grand jury.

The Dallas County DA’s Office and the Texas Rangers will interview the two women who we are told have a different account of what happened before Jean was shot in his apartment by Guyger, who says she thought she was at her apartment encountering a burglar.

“These are independent witnesses,” said Ben Crump, an attorney for the Jean family. “They don’t have a dog in this fight.”

But police do have a dog in this fight, which is probably why they never interviewed the witnesses in the first place, spending their time revising the narration instead as you can see by the screenshots below.

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